Map of Nicaragua / Central Intelligence Agency / The World Factbook / Public Domain

Introduction

The Pacific coast of Nicaragua was settled as a Spanish colony from Panama in the early 16th century. Independence from Spain was declared in 1821 and the country became an independent republic in 1838. Britain occupied the Caribbean Coast in the first half of the 19th century, but gradually ceded control of the region in subsequent decades. Violent opposition to governmental manipulation and corruption spread to all classes by 1978 and resulted in a short-lived civil war that brought a civic-military coalition, spearheaded by the Marxist Sandinista guerrillas led by Daniel ORTEGA Saavedra to power in 1979. Nicaraguan aid to leftist rebels in El Salvador prompted the US to sponsor anti-Sandinista contra guerrillas through much of the 1980s. After losing free and fair elections in 1990, 1996, and 2001, former Sandinista President Daniel ORTEGA was elected president in 2006, 2011, and most recently in 2016. Municipal, regional, and national-level elections since 2008 have been marred by widespread irregularities. Democratic institutions have weakened under the ORTEGA administration as the president has garnered full control over all branches of government, especially after cracking down on a nationwide antigovernment protest movement in 2018.

Government

Executive Branch

chief of state: President Jose Daniel ORTEGA Saavedra (since 10 January 2007); Vice President Rosario MURILLO Zambrana (since 10 January 2017); note – the president is both chief of state and head of government

head of government: President Jose Daniel ORTEGA Saavedra (since 10 January 2007); Vice President Rosario MURILLO Zambrana (since 10 January 2017)

cabinet: Council of Ministers appointed by the president

elections/appointments: president and vice president directly elected on the same ballot by qualified plurality vote for a 5-year term (no term limits as of 2014); election last held on 6 November 2016 (next to be held by November 2021)

election results: Jose Daniel ORTEGA Saavedra reelected president; percent of vote – Jose Daniel ORTEGA Saavedra (FSLN) 72.4%, Maximino RODRIGUEZ (PLC) 15%, Jose del Carmen ALVARADO (PLI) 4.5%, Saturnino CERRATO Hodgson (ALN) 4.3%, other 3.7%

Legislative Branch

description: unicameral National Assembly or Asamblea Nacional (92 seats; 70 members in multi-seat constituencies and 20 members in a single nationwide constituency directly elected by proportional representation vote; 2 seats reserved for the previous president and the runner-up candidate in the previous presidential election; members serve 5-year terms)

elections: last held on 6 November 2016 (next to be held by November 2021)

election results: percent of vote by party – NA; seats by party – FSLN 71, PLC 14, ALN 2, PLI 2, APRE 1, PC 1, YATAMA 1; composition – men 50, women 42, percent of women 45.7%

Judicial Branch

highest courts: Supreme Court or Corte Suprema de Justicia (consists of 16 judges organized into administrative, civil, criminal, and constitutional chambers)

judge selection and term of office: Supreme Court judges elected by the National Assembly to serve 5-year staggered terms

subordinate courts: Appeals Court; first instance civil, criminal, and labor courts; military courts are independent of the Supreme Court

Political parties and leaders

  • Alliance for the Republic or APRE [Carlos CANALES]
  • Conservative Party or PC [Alfredo CESAR]
  • Independent Liberal Party or PLI [Jose del Carmen ALVARADO]
  • Liberal Constitutionalist Party or PLC [Maria Haydee OSUNA]
  • Nicaraguan Liberal Alliance or ALN [Alejandro MEJIA Ferreti]
  • Sandinista National Liberation Front or FSLN [Jose Daniel ORTEGA Saavedra]
  • Sandinista Renovation Movement or MRS [Suyen BARAHONA]
  • Sons of Mother Earth or YATAMA [Brooklyn RIVERA]

Economy

Nicaragua, the poorest country in Central America and the second poorest in the Western Hemisphere, has widespread underemployment and poverty. GDP growth of 4.5% in 2017 was insufficient to make a significant difference. Textiles and agriculture combined account for nearly 50% of Nicaragua’s exports. Beef, coffee, and gold are Nicaragua’s top three export commodities.

The Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement has been in effect since April 2006 and has expanded export opportunities for many Nicaraguan agricultural and manufactured goods.

In 2013, the government granted a 50-year concession with the option for an additional 50 years to a newly formed Chinese-run company to finance and build an inter-oceanic canal and related projects, at an estimated cost of $50 billion. The canal construction has not started.

Annual percentage GDP growth in Nicaragua from 1961 to 2018 / World Bank / CC BY-4.0
GDP of Nicaragua in current US dollars from 1960 to 2018 / World Bank / CC BY-4.0
Annual percentage growth of GDP per capita in Nicaragua from 1961 to 2018 / World Bank / CC BY-4.0
GDP per capita in current US dollars in Nicaragua from 1960 to 2018 / World Bank / CC BY-4.0
Annual percentage inflation (GDP deflator) in Nicaragua from 1961 to 2018 / World Bank / CC BY-4.0
Annual percentage inflation (GDP deflator) in Nicaragua from 2000 to 2018 / World Bank / CC BY-4.0
Annual percentage inflation (GDP deflator) in Nicaragua from 1995 to 2018 / World Bank / CC BY-4.0

Unless otherwise specified, the information above comes from the Central Intelligence Agency’s The World Factbook. All photos and text reproduced here are in the public domain. Last updated on March 17, 2020.